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Meditation For Stress Management

Working during the pandemic: How to stop operating from a position of fear

Article by: Percy Bharucha

All around the world we’ve seen the worst employment crisis hit us in a while. We all know someone who has been laid off, or is forced to take pay cuts or faces delayed salary. As much as the world has been affected by the Coronavirus it’s also been affected by its economic fallout. It’s effect on the global economy and employment has been devastating.  

Research has indicated that job security and financial concerns are the highest contributors associated with anxiety and depression right now. Stress and anxiety levels are equally high among those who are employed and those who are not. Apart from these two employees are also worried about losing the intangible perks of being employed- their sense of self-esteem, a sense of purpose, to be a part of something, and the human connection. The fear of losing all of these is quite real and persistent.

Here are a few strategies that can help reduce anxiety and boost productivity: 

How to move past  

Whether you are unemployed or not it’s crucial to differentiate between expressing your feelings and getting stuck in an emotion or thought loop. It is quite important to come to terms with accepting the situation at hand and come up with strategies to manage it. It’s helpful to distinguish between productive and unproductive thoughts when it comes to anxiety. Those that lead to problem-solving can be good while the others have to be strictly avoided. It can be tough to stop the creeping thoughts reminding us of how bad it is. Here are three ways to give yourself a break- physical activity, breathing exercises, and mindfulness.  

Reach out 

The reality right now has prompted a host of philanthropic measures when it comes to mental health. There are several telephonic and video chats that provide therapy at discounted rates or free of cost. Some volunteers run helplines for those that can’t afford treatment. There are apps with low fees that provided guided mindfulness meditations and therapies. While most of us might feel that therapy is a luxury during such times of financial and employment uncertainty it’s important to research all available options for help. Reaching out is a recommended way to deal with stress and anxiety.  

Avoiding negativity 

If you’re working from home it can be quite easy to be distracted by the news or social media. We’ve all fallen into the rabbit hole of watching news videos one after another no matter how disheartening or depressing they might be. We feel that we’re keeping up, that we’re in the loop. But this constant online checking creates a spiral of worry that leads to a state of constant anxiety. It can affect your sleeping and eating habits and can quickly spiral out of control. In an article for Today magazine, Dr. Pavan Madan explains how “being constantly showered with fear-inducing content can lead to a variety of anxiety issues that can cause physical and mental discomfort.” Break the habit and distract yourself from this distraction. Spend time with your family, put your phone on silent, or walk in your backyard.  

Still a part of the whole 

One of the biggest advantages of the workplace is the human connection. Being around friends and colleagues has a therapeutic effect on us. Due to the pandemic, it can be hard to remember that connection and to not feel isolated from one another. What is crucial is that we remind ourselves of our collectivity, that we’re in this together, helping each other through this.  

For corporates more than ever it’s important to create opportunities that facilitate and promote human connection. Checking internally with teams, sharing their struggles and solutions.  

Ray Kroc famously said, “None of us is as good as all of us.” If we stick together the challenges, we face might not seem that daunting. Mindfulness meditation can not only help cultivate a sense of personal inner calm but it’s can also equally help with sharing that with others for the greater good. If you do find your peace through meditation or whatever it’s important to share that with others, to send it out into the world so that we can all move forward together through this trying time. 

Also See: Work from home: Communicating boundaries with your family

Working during the pandemic: How to stop operating from a position of fear

Article by: Percy Bharucha

All around the world we’ve seen the worst employment crisis hit us in a while. We all know someone who has been laid off, or is forced to take pay cuts or faces delayed salary. As much as the world has been affected by the Coronavirus it’s also been affected by its economic fallout. It’s effect on the global economy and employment has been devastating.  

Research has indicated that job security and financial concerns are the highest contributors associated with anxiety and depression right now. Stress and anxiety levels are equally high among those who are employed and those who are not. Apart from these two employees are also worried about losing the intangible perks of being employed- their sense of self-esteem, a sense of purpose, to be a part of something, and the human connection. The fear of losing all of these is quite real and persistent.

Here are a few strategies that can help reduce anxiety and boost productivity: 

How to move past  

Whether you are unemployed or not it’s crucial to differentiate between expressing your feelings and getting stuck in an emotion or thought loop. It is quite important to come to terms with accepting the situation at hand and come up with strategies to manage it. It’s helpful to distinguish between productive and unproductive thoughts when it comes to anxiety. Those that lead to problem-solving can be good while the others have to be strictly avoided. It can be tough to stop the creeping thoughts reminding us of how bad it is. Here are three ways to give yourself a break- physical activity, breathing exercises, and mindfulness.  

Reach out 

The reality right now has prompted a host of philanthropic measures when it comes to mental health. There are several telephonic and video chats that provide therapy at discounted rates or free of cost. Some volunteers run helplines for those that can’t afford treatment. There are apps with low fees that provided guided mindfulness meditations and therapies. While most of us might feel that therapy is a luxury during such times of financial and employment uncertainty it’s important to research all available options for help. Reaching out is a recommended way to deal with stress and anxiety.  

Avoiding negativity 

If you’re working from home it can be quite easy to be distracted by the news or social media. We’ve all fallen into the rabbit hole of watching news videos one after another no matter how disheartening or depressing they might be. We feel that we’re keeping up, that we’re in the loop. But this constant online checking creates a spiral of worry that leads to a state of constant anxiety. It can affect your sleeping and eating habits and can quickly spiral out of control. In an article for Today magazine, Dr. Pavan Madan explains how “being constantly showered with fear-inducing content can lead to a variety of anxiety issues that can cause physical and mental discomfort.” Break the habit and distract yourself from this distraction. Spend time with your family, put your phone on silent, or walk in your backyard.  

Still a part of the whole 

One of the biggest advantages of the workplace is the human connection. Being around friends and colleagues has a therapeutic effect on us. Due to the pandemic, it can be hard to remember that connection and to not feel isolated from one another. What is crucial is that we remind ourselves of our collectivity, that we’re in this together, helping each other through this.  

For corporates more than ever it’s important to create opportunities that facilitate and promote human connection. Checking internally with teams, sharing their struggles and solutions.  

Ray Kroc famously said, “None of us is as good as all of us.” If we stick together the challenges, we face might not seem that daunting. Mindfulness meditation can not only help cultivate a sense of personal inner calm but it’s can also equally help with sharing that with others for the greater good. If you do find your peace through meditation or whatever it’s important to share that with others, to send it out into the world so that we can all move forward together through this trying time. 

Also See: Work from home: Communicating boundaries with your family

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Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Connect with us:

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com