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Why are Indian Olympians meditating with Dhyana?

Article by: Bhairav Shankar

When we, as children, played on the field, we always looked up to that one person whom we believed was gifted. Everyone wanted them on their team, because without them your team felt weak. Playing the sport came effortlessly to them, almost intuitively they would guide their team to victory. It did not matter who was on the opposing team, they always seem to know just how to win the game.

In a country of over a billion people, we must have many such gifted men and women across the land, however India seems to always lag behind the rest of the world in the medal tally, especially at the Olympics. If India has the people, then why aren’t the medals flowing in?

To understand this, we first need to understand how the Olympics work. The Olympics are constructed as a prestige event, the winners are the world leaders, USA, USSR, China etc. it allows them the space to flex their international muscles when their teams go home with the most medals. Hence, to some authoritarian countries, winning medals is now a state activity.

Take the example of Sun Yang, the Chinese swimmer who is a gold medal favourite; whisked away from his family at the age of 9 to start training to be an athlete. Imagine yourself at the age of 9, completing a few laps in a pool, when the government shows up and takes you away from your family with the sole intention to win medals!

What about East Germany? Before the fall of the Berlin Wall, in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, they raked in 102 medals. West Germany only raked in a measly 40 medals. After the German Unification, you’d expect a total tally of 140 medals, however in 1992 Barcelona’s Olympics they were able to rake up just 80 medals as a unified country.

What changed? Did the lack of Soviet oppression kill their spirit?

After reading the above, you may have the sense that India doses’t stand a chance of winning as long as we’re not in a totalitarian dictatorship… but there’s an exception to the rule: The United State of America.

While we definitely cannot idolise the US (it too conducted similar training for children as the Soviets) the recent performance of the US and the UK aren’t built on oppressive training, but from sheer will to succeed. Michael Phelps, the greatest Olympian ever, said ”If you want to be the best, you have to do things other’s aren’t willing to do.” Here, he’s not talking about the nation orthe team, but himself. His quote isn’t “If your country wants you to be the best,” but “If YOU want to be the best.”

The Olympics is probably the last arena for the 20th century battle between the individual and the state. While one carries (and is often smothered by) the weight of the nation, the other is the strength of the individual spirit, which the nation should support but never demand. The US’s success at every Olympic games is testament to the fact that the Individual’s will is the greatest motivation for success.

This is where meditation becomes the key differentiator. What most don’t understand about meditation is that, it’s not just a relaxation exercise, but  a combination of relaxation, concentration and introspection. It involves relaxation, to simply remove  the influence of the body, it makes you concentrate, just to remove the influence of the surroundings. The sole purpose of meditation is to give the mind the space to really look into itself, to find its truth and therein the motivation to move forward.

The Chicago Bulls’ famous coach Phil Jackson, who made players like Michael Jordan and Scott Pippin meditate, famously said: The strength of a team is each individual player. The internal mental strength to push forward came from meditation, competitiveness was something that he could never teach, it had to come from within. This sentiment echoes throughout the world, even in India, P. Gopichand, India’s most successful coach makes meditation part and parcel of every athlete’s daily practise, not only to help them relax and concentrate, but to unleash their inner desire for victory.

Simple right? Everyone needs to meditate, and therein lies the key to success. Here’s the next part of the puzzle: how many of us actually meditate? We know the benefits of it, the words above are something we may be aware of, yet, meditation isn’t part of our daily routine. And if we’re unable to sit down and meditate, then how do we expect players to, especially when their bodies are pulsing with adrenaline? Would they listen to their coaches and meditate, or simply close their eyes and wait for the 15 minutes to get over?

This is when the Indian Olympic Association and  multiple sporting federations reached out to Dhyana to work with them. Athletes set fitness goals, nutrition goals, even sleep goals. With Dhyana, they can set meditation goals. The intuitive power of having a goal to hit everyday is something that drives us. We exercise to close the rings on the Apple Watch, sleep till our apps tell us to, but now with the technology Dhyana is spearheading, we can set the time we need to be mindful for, and close the ring that is specifically  for meditation.

At the highest levels of sport, the difference between success and defeat isn’t a question of physical prowess. It’s how much one wants it over the other, it’s the ability to not buckle under pressure and the will to see it through to the end. It’s also the ability to take defeat on your chin, brush it off and then get back up on stage to fight another bout.

If one views sport as a non-lethal combat, then this quote from legendary general Sun Tzu is apt: If the mind is willing, then the flesh could go on and on without many things.

Why are Indian Olympians meditating with Dhyana?

Article by: Bhairav Shankar

When we, as children, played on the field, we always looked up to that one person whom we believed was gifted. Everyone wanted them on their team, because without them your team felt weak. Playing the sport came effortlessly to them, almost intuitively they would guide their team to victory. It did not matter who was on the opposing team, they always seem to know just how to win the game.

In a country of over a billion people, we must have many such gifted men and women across the land, however India seems to always lag behind the rest of the world in the medal tally, especially at the Olympics. If India has the people, then why aren’t the medals flowing in?

To understand this, we first need to understand how the Olympics work. The Olympics are constructed as a prestige event, the winners are the world leaders, USA, USSR, China etc. it allows them the space to flex their international muscles when their teams go home with the most medals. Hence, to some authoritarian countries, winning medals is now a state activity.

Take the example of Sun Yang, the Chinese swimmer who is a gold medal favourite; whisked away from his family at the age of 9 to start training to be an athlete. Imagine yourself at the age of 9, completing a few laps in a pool, when the government shows up and takes you away from your family with the sole intention to win medals!

What about East Germany? Before the fall of the Berlin Wall, in the 1988 Seoul Olympics, they raked in 102 medals. West Germany only raked in a measly 40 medals. After the German Unification, you’d expect a total tally of 140 medals, however in 1992 Barcelona’s Olympics they were able to rake up just 80 medals as a unified country.

What changed? Did the lack of Soviet oppression kill their spirit?

After reading the above, you may have the sense that India doses’t stand a chance of winning as long as we’re not in a totalitarian dictatorship… but there’s an exception to the rule: The United State of America.

While we definitely cannot idolise the US (it too conducted similar training for children as the Soviets) the recent performance of the US and the UK aren’t built on oppressive training, but from sheer will to succeed. Michael Phelps, the greatest Olympian ever, said ”If you want to be the best, you have to do things other’s aren’t willing to do.” Here, he’s not talking about the nation orthe team, but himself. His quote isn’t “If your country wants you to be the best,” but “If YOU want to be the best.”

The Olympics is probably the last arena for the 20th century battle between the individual and the state. While one carries (and is often smothered by) the weight of the nation, the other is the strength of the individual spirit, which the nation should support but never demand. The US’s success at every Olympic games is testament to the fact that the Individual’s will is the greatest motivation for success.

This is where meditation becomes the key differentiator. What most don’t understand about meditation is that, it’s not just a relaxation exercise, but  a combination of relaxation, concentration and introspection. It involves relaxation, to simply remove  the influence of the body, it makes you concentrate, just to remove the influence of the surroundings. The sole purpose of meditation is to give the mind the space to really look into itself, to find its truth and therein the motivation to move forward.

The Chicago Bulls’ famous coach Phil Jackson, who made players like Michael Jordan and Scott Pippin meditate, famously said: The strength of a team is each individual player. The internal mental strength to push forward came from meditation, competitiveness was something that he could never teach, it had to come from within. This sentiment echoes throughout the world, even in India, P. Gopichand, India’s most successful coach makes meditation part and parcel of every athlete’s daily practise, not only to help them relax and concentrate, but to unleash their inner desire for victory.

Simple right? Everyone needs to meditate, and therein lies the key to success. Here’s the next part of the puzzle: how many of us actually meditate? We know the benefits of it, the words above are something we may be aware of, yet, meditation isn’t part of our daily routine. And if we’re unable to sit down and meditate, then how do we expect players to, especially when their bodies are pulsing with adrenaline? Would they listen to their coaches and meditate, or simply close their eyes and wait for the 15 minutes to get over?

This is when the Indian Olympic Association and  multiple sporting federations reached out to Dhyana to work with them. Athletes set fitness goals, nutrition goals, even sleep goals. With Dhyana, they can set meditation goals. The intuitive power of having a goal to hit everyday is something that drives us. We exercise to close the rings on the Apple Watch, sleep till our apps tell us to, but now with the technology Dhyana is spearheading, we can set the time we need to be mindful for, and close the ring that is specifically  for meditation.

At the highest levels of sport, the difference between success and defeat isn’t a question of physical prowess. It’s how much one wants it over the other, it’s the ability to not buckle under pressure and the will to see it through to the end. It’s also the ability to take defeat on your chin, brush it off and then get back up on stage to fight another bout.

If one views sport as a non-lethal combat, then this quote from legendary general Sun Tzu is apt: If the mind is willing, then the flesh could go on and on without many things.

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Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Connect with us:

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com