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Brain centres activated after chronic meditation practice

One ring to rule them all : Memory, Focus, Emotions and Creativity

Article by: Dnyanada Sahasrabudhe

The ardent explorations of the archaeologist Sir John Marshall in the ruins of Indus Valley civilization led to the discovery of the Pashupati Seal, the oldest documented evidence of meditation dating back to 5000-35000 BCE. Along with ancient psychological abilities such as communicating one’s thoughts, reading others’ intentions and making alliances, the practice of meditation has been conserved across decades of human cognitive evolution. 

Albeit used in spiritual or religious documents, querying the term “meditation” on PubMED, the largest repository for life science and biochemical journals will give you 7,744 hits. The number of publications as a function of time demonstrates an inflated interest in the research field since the past ~20 years.

Key brain areas affected by meditative intervention

Multiple research studies demonstrate that the practice of meditation is associated with structural changes in pivotal brain regions: the frontopolar cortex that is associated with attention regulation, the hippocampus that is associated with memory processes, the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala that are associated with emotional regulation and corpus callosum that is associated with creativity and enhanced connection between the left and right hemispheres of the brain. 

Imbibing meditative practice in your daily schedule can enhance your focus, memory retention, help you subside unnecessary emotional reactions and boost your creativity.

Clinical trials have also shown that meditation can ameliorate negative symptoms coupled with generalized anxiety, addictions, attention deficit disorders and depression.

Most of these studies use a cross-sectional paradigm, i.e. test the changes in brain connectivity between advanced meditators to someone unaware of the practice. So how can a beginner assess whether the practice is helping them expand their mental capacities? 

That is when Dhyana comes into the picture. 

Dhyana’s smart wearable ring has an inbuilt PPG sensor that measures Heart Rate Variability (HRV) which constantly monitors your body’s Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) or your state of meditative tranquility. The Dhyana app records and customizes your sessions to reinforces the correct way of meditating.

One ring to rule them all : Memory, Focus, Emotions and Creativity

Article by: Dnyanada Sahasrabudhe

The ardent explorations of the archaeologist Sir John Marshall in the ruins of Indus Valley civilization led to the discovery of the Pashupati Seal, the oldest documented evidence of meditation dating back to 5000-35000 BCE. Along with ancient psychological abilities such as communicating one’s thoughts, reading others’ intentions and making alliances, the practice of meditation has been conserved across decades of human cognitive evolution. 

Albeit used in spiritual or religious documents, querying the term “meditation” on PubMED, the largest repository for life science and biochemical journals will give you 7,744 hits. The number of publications as a function of time demonstrates an inflated interest in the research field since the past ~20 years.

Key brain areas affected by meditative intervention

Multiple research studies demonstrate that the practice of meditation is associated with structural changes in pivotal brain regions: the frontopolar cortex that is associated with attention regulation, the hippocampus that is associated with memory processes, the anterior cingulate cortex and amygdala that are associated with emotional regulation and corpus callosum that is associated with creativity and enhanced connection between the left and right hemispheres of the brain. 

Imbibing meditative practice in your daily schedule can enhance your focus, memory retention, help you subside unnecessary emotional reactions and boost your creativity.

Clinical trials have also shown that meditation can ameliorate negative symptoms coupled with generalized anxiety, addictions, attention deficit disorders and depression.

Most of these studies use a cross-sectional paradigm, i.e. test the changes in brain connectivity between advanced meditators to someone unaware of the practice. So how can a beginner assess whether the practice is helping them expand their mental capacities? 

That is when Dhyana comes into the picture. 

Dhyana’s smart wearable ring has an inbuilt PPG sensor that measures Heart Rate Variability (HRV) which constantly monitors your body’s Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) or your state of meditative tranquility. The Dhyana app records and customizes your sessions to reinforces the correct way of meditating.

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Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Connect with us:

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com