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Mindfulness Meditation & Proud: A Mindful Lesson in Self-Discovery |Dhyana

Mindful and Proud

Article by: Bhairav Shankar

Pride is a weird word, it evokes so many thoughts and emotions, well beyond our immediate understanding. To those who attend mass on Sunday, pride is the ultimate sin, the seventh circle of Dante’s hell. But to many, the word evokes the Stonewall Rebellion, a landmark moment in the LGBTQ+ movement.

To most of us millennials, we tend to brush past the history of major movements as we were born when these movements bore fruit. We embraced the gay community from shows such as Will and Grace, and we can’t believe people can exist that can’t tolerate those who are different to us.

However, just a few decades ago the shoe was on the other foot.

On June 28th, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in New York’s Lower Manhattan, the community came together in secret. They came to the place where they could finally be themselves, apart from the charade they put on for everyone else. The Stonewall Inn, a mafia-run establishment, was one of their only sources of refuge.

However on that Saturday, the police raided the Inn and it turned into a violent protest to protect one’s liberty to love and to be themselves. Thousands of people fought back the police for two nights to emphasise the single freedom we all cherish. Our right to feel proud of who we are.

This month is a call for us, whether we’re LGBTQ+ or otherwise, to break away from social constructs that limit us from appreciating ourselves and is a holiday to celebrate our divine right to open ourselves up to the world.

Meditation is inherently the exercise of opening ourselves up to the universe and its practise can help all of us assimilate better in a more cohesive, unified, loving and caring community whether you’re male, female, heterosexual, cisgender or otherwise.

Strong minds can’t be closeted

To be mindful doesn’t give you the ability to stop feeling. In fact it’s the opposite, you tend to feel more than you ever realised. At the very beginning of the practise, as you focus on your breath everytime your mind wanders, you tell yourself Tomorrow I won’t be taken for a ride by that emotion again because that’s what emotions do, they introduce themselves and expose our lack of courage.

When we’re mindful, we find our anchor, the point where we’re undisturbed and stationary. I’d argue that an anchored ship would be bruised more by a storm than an unanchored one, as the former needs to stay there and whether the entire might of the storm, while the latter can be swept away by it, preferably to safer winds.

However, a problem viewed from only one angle reveals no truth. It’s like looking at the horizon and concluding the world is flat, as it’s all you can see — the truth is far more complex. It requires us to put ourselves in the shoes of those we may not agree with, those we hate, to find the middle ground.

Most of us struggle with our identity, who we are and what is our sexual preference. We may be young in school, or old and married, the question of who we are always arises, and unless we dig our mental heels in and really weather the storm of thoughts that come in and really wade through them, we’ll always be left wondering.

Being mindful isn’t a chore, it’s an act you can do for just two minutes a day, quietly sitting and contemplating. If you’re not sure whether you’re anchored in well or not, try the dhyana app. If you’re mindfulness index is about 80% you’re ready for any storm.

Accept yourself

The greatest obstacle to opening ourselves up is our inability to accept ourself completely. We’re always second guessing ourselves and try to be people we’re not just to fit in. While there may be situations where this is necessary, it shouldn’t be allowed to kill the true individual spirit that resides within us.

This is the strange thing about society, while it’s capacity to behave as a protective and caring force is something we all rely on, it can sometimes be rigid and not welcoming to change. When this happens, society stops us from completely accepting the person we see in the mirror.

However, while we may choose to stay within the social norms for whatever our reasons may be, we need to accept ourselves completely. Most of us may not have the avenues to express ourselves completely, but accepting ourselves allows us to slowly nudge the community and society to change, because the only way to move a rigid structure, is from the inside.

Meditation and mindfulness teach us introspection and the things we discover there reveal our true nature, whatever it may be. This may be contradictory to your previously thought ideas or notions, but the truth is inescapable and infallible. Meditation also is only possible for the calm minds, and the calm mind tends to accept truths without resistance.

This act of understanding and embracing ourselves, allows us to see the world around us in new light, helping us push the buck forward and making the people around us accept us for who we are.

A great example of this is the late Englishman in New York Quentin Crisp. As he walked the streets of New York and London in makeup and painted nails, he generated curiosity and intrigue, and slowly shifted people’s way of thinking into accepting queer and gay people.

Empathy is key

Of course the most important thing meditation teaches us is empathy. If you want your society to understand you, or if you want to understand them, then empathy is key. Most of us view a problem from one perspective: ours. Of course the mind is tuned to selfishness, it is in fact our nature to look out for our own self interest above any other.

However a problem viewed from only one angle reveals no truth. It’s like looking at the horizon and concluding the world is flat, as its all you can see. However, the truth is far more complex. It requires us to put ourselves in the shoes of those we may not agree with, those we hate, to find the middle ground.

One thing that mindfulness teaches us is that life doesn’t work in binaries. There is no right and wrong, and the correct action and path are right for some and wrong for others. Compromise is hence the only way forward, which requires both sides to win a little and lose a little. As Larry David says in Curb Your Enthusiasm, “a good compromise is when both parties are dissatisfied”.

On a humorous note, it’s the reason why meditation and mediation are just one character apart. in fact one could argue that mediations would happen in a much smoother and timely manner is both sides meditated. A valid theory, maybe it can be trialed in the next meeting with India/Pakistan or israel/Palestine when all participants need to get their 21 mindful minutes for a week before they start their mediation.

Jokes aside, meditation and mindfulness are key to our growth and acceptance of those who don’t fit our cisgender term of “normal”. In the free love movement in the 60’s is when people across the world began to accept those of the LGBTQ+ community, and apart from the drugs, the movement was powered by meditation.

Stay mindful, stay open hearted and Happy Pride Month!

Mindful and Proud

Article by: Bhairav Shankar

Pride is a weird word, it evokes so many thoughts and emotions, well beyond our immediate understanding. To those who attend mass on Sunday, pride is the ultimate sin, the seventh circle of Dante’s hell. But to many, the word evokes the Stonewall Rebellion, a landmark moment in the LGBTQ+ movement.

To most of us millennials, we tend to brush past the history of major movements as we were born when these movements bore fruit. We embraced the gay community from shows such as Will and Grace, and we can’t believe people can exist that can’t tolerate those who are different to us.

However, just a few decades ago the shoe was on the other foot.

On June 28th, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in New York’s Lower Manhattan, the community came together in secret. They came to the place where they could finally be themselves, apart from the charade they put on for everyone else. The Stonewall Inn, a mafia-run establishment, was one of their only sources of refuge.

However on that Saturday, the police raided the Inn and it turned into a violent protest to protect one’s liberty to love and to be themselves. Thousands of people fought back the police for two nights to emphasise the single freedom we all cherish. Our right to feel proud of who we are.

This month is a call for us, whether we’re LGBTQ+ or otherwise, to break away from social constructs that limit us from appreciating ourselves and is a holiday to celebrate our divine right to open ourselves up to the world.

Meditation is inherently the exercise of opening ourselves up to the universe and its practise can help all of us assimilate better in a more cohesive, unified, loving and caring community whether you’re male, female, heterosexual, cisgender or otherwise.

Strong minds can’t be closeted

To be mindful doesn’t give you the ability to stop feeling. In fact it’s the opposite, you tend to feel more than you ever realised. At the very beginning of the practise, as you focus on your breath everytime your mind wanders, you tell yourself Tomorrow I won’t be taken for a ride by that emotion again because that’s what emotions do, they introduce themselves and expose our lack of courage.

When we’re mindful, we find our anchor, the point where we’re undisturbed and stationary. I’d argue that an anchored ship would be bruised more by a storm than an unanchored one, as the former needs to stay there and whether the entire might of the storm, while the latter can be swept away by it, preferably to safer winds.

However, a problem viewed from only one angle reveals no truth. It’s like looking at the horizon and concluding the world is flat, as it’s all you can see — the truth is far more complex. It requires us to put ourselves in the shoes of those we may not agree with, those we hate, to find the middle ground.

Most of us struggle with our identity, who we are and what is our sexual preference. We may be young in school, or old and married, the question of who we are always arises, and unless we dig our mental heels in and really weather the storm of thoughts that come in and really wade through them, we’ll always be left wondering.

Being mindful isn’t a chore, it’s an act you can do for just two minutes a day, quietly sitting and contemplating. If you’re not sure whether you’re anchored in well or not, try the dhyana app. If you’re mindfulness index is about 80% you’re ready for any storm.

Accept yourself

The greatest obstacle to opening ourselves up is our inability to accept ourself completely. We’re always second guessing ourselves and try to be people we’re not just to fit in. While there may be situations where this is necessary, it shouldn’t be allowed to kill the true individual spirit that resides within us.

This is the strange thing about society, while it’s capacity to behave as a protective and caring force is something we all rely on, it can sometimes be rigid and not welcoming to change. When this happens, society stops us from completely accepting the person we see in the mirror.

However, while we may choose to stay within the social norms for whatever our reasons may be, we need to accept ourselves completely. Most of us may not have the avenues to express ourselves completely, but accepting ourselves allows us to slowly nudge the community and society to change, because the only way to move a rigid structure, is from the inside.

Meditation and mindfulness teach us introspection and the things we discover there reveal our true nature, whatever it may be. This may be contradictory to your previously thought ideas or notions, but the truth is inescapable and infallible. Meditation also is only possible for the calm minds, and the calm mind tends to accept truths without resistance.

This act of understanding and embracing ourselves, allows us to see the world around us in new light, helping us push the buck forward and making the people around us accept us for who we are.

A great example of this is the late Englishman in New York Quentin Crisp. As he walked the streets of New York and London in makeup and painted nails, he generated curiosity and intrigue, and slowly shifted people’s way of thinking into accepting queer and gay people.

Empathy is key

Of course the most important thing meditation teaches us is empathy. If you want your society to understand you, or if you want to understand them, then empathy is key. Most of us view a problem from one perspective: ours. Of course the mind is tuned to selfishness, it is in fact our nature to look out for our own self interest above any other.

However a problem viewed from only one angle reveals no truth. It’s like looking at the horizon and concluding the world is flat, as its all you can see. However, the truth is far more complex. It requires us to put ourselves in the shoes of those we may not agree with, those we hate, to find the middle ground.

One thing that mindfulness teaches us is that life doesn’t work in binaries. There is no right and wrong, and the correct action and path are right for some and wrong for others. Compromise is hence the only way forward, which requires both sides to win a little and lose a little. As Larry David says in Curb Your Enthusiasm, “a good compromise is when both parties are dissatisfied”.

On a humorous note, it’s the reason why meditation and mediation are just one character apart. in fact one could argue that mediations would happen in a much smoother and timely manner is both sides meditated. A valid theory, maybe it can be trialed in the next meeting with India/Pakistan or israel/Palestine when all participants need to get their 21 mindful minutes for a week before they start their mediation.

Jokes aside, meditation and mindfulness are key to our growth and acceptance of those who don’t fit our cisgender term of “normal”. In the free love movement in the 60’s is when people across the world began to accept those of the LGBTQ+ community, and apart from the drugs, the movement was powered by meditation.

Stay mindful, stay open hearted and Happy Pride Month!

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Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Connect with us:

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com