stress relief meditation

Flattening the Stress Curve

Article by: Team Dhyana

Using mindfulness to get through the Covid crisis.

In times of crisis, such as these, it’s quite normal to be anxious and scared. The absence of daily routine and being unable to meet people can be hard to adapt to. In the absence of daily help, juggling, work, family and daily chores can also get overwhelming. The looming fear of an uncertain future can make your brain go into overdrive thinking about all the scary possibilities.

Living in these adverse conditions requires you to pay extra attention to your mental health. Learning how to tolerate uncertainty, coping with financial pressures, and taking care of family members is a huge ask. Here’s how mindfulness can help deal with the most painful aspects of a Covid infested world:

Managing Uncertainty.

It has been researched that there is a strong link between our perceived lack of control and burnout. Given how little control you have over your current situation, burnout becomes a highly probable outcome. You might suddenly discover a lack of energy or enthusiasm for your daily/ work activities. You might feel more tired than usual or sleep a lot longer. It’s a highly understandable state to go through. The worst thing you can do at that moment is to judge yourself for it.

If you are a healthcare worker or a physician right now, you will be under tremendous pressure. Doctors, in general, are overworked but this pandemic has taken it to a whole new level. Constant burnout amongst frontline workers can also lead to cynicism, emotional exhaustion, and demotivation.

Thankfully mindfulness training can help and play a significant role in keeping you grounded, positive, and emotionally stable. Mindfulness is centering yourself and living in the moment, rather than dwelling in the past or worrying about the future. It helps reduce anxiety by helping individuals recognize and acknowledge negative thinking patterns and without judgment dismiss them.

Mindfulness helps identify feelings and recognize their root which is a sense of threat. It prevents you from reacting mindlessly. When you’re in fight-flight-freeze mode the limbic system hijacks the mind and dominates the pre-frontal cortex which is the most recently evolved part of the brain. It is the part that is responsible for executive functioning and making good decisions. When we identify and name what we feel we activate the pre-frontal cortex and reboot the mind. Mindfulness enables us to do that.

Its breathing exercises help you pause and think clearly before you act. Breathing is intrinsically linked to relaxation and helps you take a pause when you feel discomfort. Long, deep, breaths help calm the sympathetic nervous system. By relaxing the body, you can reduce your stress levels and alleviate emotional distress. Thus, meditation sessions helps you become calm in the moment of chaos itself.

Alleviating Boredom

Another by-product of the lockdown is managing time. How to fill time that was earlier occupied by social interactions, commutes is now becoming a cause of anxiety itself. Most people have tried to alleviate this boredom through binge-watching or using food as a coping mechanism. But mindfulness can help us put this time to better use. It can help us focus attention to use this time more productively. To introspect or take up new hobbies or enroll in online learning programs. It can help you use this time to amplify your potential towards reaching your goals.

Mindfulness also helps you maintain a balanced emotional state. This enables you to reach out and renew old friendships and get in touch with individuals that you’ve always wanted to reconnect with. To support and check up on each other and to solidify existing relationships. In the words of The Beatles we need to, “come together, right now”

For the Future

Mindfulness also allows you to notice your own defensive reactions that emerge as a response to avoiding discomfort. The strategies you use to repress, or numb the feeling of discomfort or pain become apparent during this time. Now is the time to identify them and work on them for the future. To better yourself for the post Covid world.

The feeling of being threatened can hamper our problem-solving mind to work clearly. Instead, it focuses on doing what it can to make you feel better. This leads to selfishness. For example, you feel threatened that you might run out of groceries. Instead of thinking about other, you hoard groceries. You do this because it reduces your fear. But being mindful helps us recognize this action isn’t rational. It frees you from self-serving actions and urges you to act better for all of society.

One of the biggest silver linings of this pandemic is we’ve realized that our normal doesn’t work. The single most important thing getting us through this is our ‘collective’- the fact that we’re there to help each other come out of this stronger. And each one of us can indeed help. It’s just about stepping forward. Once you find your inner calm, your inner peace, share it, calmness is contagious and is the need of the hour.

Right now, practicing mindfulness is more of a responsibility, you have a duty to share the calmness it brings with others. To create concentric rings of peace around you starting with your family and extending to friends and then slowly their friends.

In times of great crisis when everything is crumbling mindfulness can help us rebuild, rebuild ourselves and the world around us. The potential to build a kinder, more giving world starts with you. It starts with building a kinder, more giving version of yourself and mindfulness can help you get there.

Flattening the Stress Curve

Article by: Team Dhyana

Using mindfulness to get through the Covid crisis.

In times of crisis, such as these, it’s quite normal to be anxious and scared. The absence of daily routine and being unable to meet people can be hard to adapt to. In the absence of daily help, juggling, work, family and daily chores can also get overwhelming. The looming fear of an uncertain future can make your brain go into overdrive thinking about all the scary possibilities.

Living in these adverse conditions requires you to pay extra attention to your mental health. Learning how to tolerate uncertainty, coping with financial pressures, and taking care of family members is a huge ask. Here’s how mindfulness can help deal with the most painful aspects of a Covid infested world:

Managing Uncertainty.

It has been researched that there is a strong link between our perceived lack of control and burnout. Given how little control you have over your current situation, burnout becomes a highly probable outcome. You might suddenly discover a lack of energy or enthusiasm for your daily/ work activities. You might feel more tired than usual or sleep a lot longer. It’s a highly understandable state to go through. The worst thing you can do at that moment is to judge yourself for it.

If you are a healthcare worker or a physician right now, you will be under tremendous pressure. Doctors, in general, are overworked but this pandemic has taken it to a whole new level. Constant burnout amongst frontline workers can also lead to cynicism, emotional exhaustion, and demotivation.

Thankfully mindfulness training can help and play a significant role in keeping you grounded, positive, and emotionally stable. Mindfulness is centering yourself and living in the moment, rather than dwelling in the past or worrying about the future. It helps reduce anxiety by helping individuals recognize and acknowledge negative thinking patterns and without judgment dismiss them.

Mindfulness helps identify feelings and recognize their root which is a sense of threat. It prevents you from reacting mindlessly. When you’re in fight-flight-freeze mode the limbic system hijacks the mind and dominates the pre-frontal cortex which is the most recently evolved part of the brain. It is the part that is responsible for executive functioning and making good decisions. When we identify and name what we feel we activate the pre-frontal cortex and reboot the mind. Mindfulness enables us to do that.

Its breathing exercises help you pause and think clearly before you act. Breathing is intrinsically linked to relaxation and helps you take a pause when you feel discomfort. Long, deep, breaths help calm the sympathetic nervous system. By relaxing the body, you can reduce your stress levels and alleviate emotional distress. Thus, meditation sessions helps you become calm in the moment of chaos itself.

Alleviating Boredom

Another by-product of the lockdown is managing time. How to fill time that was earlier occupied by social interactions, commutes is now becoming a cause of anxiety itself. Most people have tried to alleviate this boredom through binge-watching or using food as a coping mechanism. But mindfulness can help us put this time to better use. It can help us focus attention to use this time more productively. To introspect or take up new hobbies or enroll in online learning programs. It can help you use this time to amplify your potential towards reaching your goals.

Mindfulness also helps you maintain a balanced emotional state. This enables you to reach out and renew old friendships and get in touch with individuals that you’ve always wanted to reconnect with. To support and check up on each other and to solidify existing relationships. In the words of The Beatles we need to, “come together, right now”

For the Future

Mindfulness also allows you to notice your own defensive reactions that emerge as a response to avoiding discomfort. The strategies you use to repress, or numb the feeling of discomfort or pain become apparent during this time. Now is the time to identify them and work on them for the future. To better yourself for the post Covid world.

The feeling of being threatened can hamper our problem-solving mind to work clearly. Instead, it focuses on doing what it can to make you feel better. This leads to selfishness. For example, you feel threatened that you might run out of groceries. Instead of thinking about other, you hoard groceries. You do this because it reduces your fear. But being mindful helps us recognize this action isn’t rational. It frees you from self-serving actions and urges you to act better for all of society.

One of the biggest silver linings of this pandemic is we’ve realized that our normal doesn’t work. The single most important thing getting us through this is our ‘collective’- the fact that we’re there to help each other come out of this stronger. And each one of us can indeed help. It’s just about stepping forward. Once you find your inner calm, your inner peace, share it, calmness is contagious and is the need of the hour.

Right now, practicing mindfulness is more of a responsibility, you have a duty to share the calmness it brings with others. To create concentric rings of peace around you starting with your family and extending to friends and then slowly their friends.

In times of great crisis when everything is crumbling mindfulness can help us rebuild, rebuild ourselves and the world around us. The potential to build a kinder, more giving world starts with you. It starts with building a kinder, more giving version of yourself and mindfulness can help you get there.

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+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com



Accepted payment methods:

Cards

Paypal

Connect with us:

Dhyana is made in India by Avantari
+91 9346 2056 75 | support@smartdhyana.com